A new mid section arrived on Thursday to replace a broken section on my 9 foot # 5/6 Spring Creek fly rod. This is a good little rod and the ebay people “tacklediscounts” have always treated me well. This is an inexpensive fishing rod but it casts well and certainly meets my needs quite adequately. I don´t have the casting skills to particularly benefit from a “decent” rod and nor do I have the budget. My wife tells me that putting food on the table and diesel in the car is a higher priority than spending dosh on expensive fishing tackle. If I had known at the time that she had such a warped sense of priority I would never have married her!

This rod puts me back in action again after losing a similar rod in an appalling maritime disaster a couple of weeks ago. This sad event was the subject of an earlier blog entry and I have no wish to revisit it now.

I took my new wand to the Guadalhorce yesterday evening to see if my new middle section was a fish catcher. Thankfully it lived up to its billing and put me in touch with three gipsy barbel, one of which I photographed. Each took a little pink nymph which is a pretty crude tying from the thin plastic of a plastic bag from the supermarket. This fly is pretty much all I use now. The carp and barbel have a soft spot for it and my failure to catch fish seems to be much likely to result from a clumsy cast or noisy approach than the chosen fly.

All was well on the river. It is thinning now, as expected at the tail end of a dry summer and while we wait for the autumn rains. The evening can be a tricky time to fish since the sunlight strikes the surface at a low angle and it is difficult to spot fish unless you are quite close to them. As the evening developed some carp were feeding in the shallow water of the river´s margin but they could not be seen without having to be approached very closely. And, of course, they would have none of it.

On the drive home I kept an eye out for the red necked nightjars which crouch over the gravel road. In the summer I would expect to see a few, even just on the few hundred metres travelled before joining the busy A357. A couple of promising forms were seen in the distance but, on closer inspection, they turned out to be horse shit!

Finally, when I had all but given up hope and was approaching the roundabout which links to the main road, a hawk-like bird took to the air and identified itself with the conspicuous white bars on its wings. It occurred to me, as it swept from the full beams of the approaching car, that this would likely be the last I would see this year and that this bird would soon leave Europe and make its way to overwinter in Africa.

 

Removing the nymph from the beached fish

Removing the nymph from the beached fish

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About to go back

About to go back